2019 Events Programme

Here is our exciting programme of events

Tuesday 8th January

Committee Meeting

Wednesday, 16th January

The AGM, Followed by “Spitfires” video

Wednesday, 20th February

Mike Lee: “The Boston Typhoon Deep Sea Trawler”
Britain is an island nation and our fishing fleet is manned, and always has been manned, by the proud and couragous fishermen of our coastal towns. Deep sea fishing operates in all weathers at all times of the year and these men (overwhelmingly men) sign on knowing that every trip will test their strength, courage and endurance to the very limits. Their lives of course depend on the strength of their ships, their trawlers, which often have to work in the most apalling weather conditions. Inspired by the quality and strength of these trawlers and their crews Mike has chosen to celebrate the mettle of this amazing industry by modelling a classic Trawler that represents the very best of British fishing fleet shipbuilding. He will talk about the heroism of the crews, and about the intricacies of modelling a 1/32nd scale model of the Boston Typhoon.

Wednesday, 20th March

Member’s Contribution Evening
Various disperate (desparate?) “volunteers” (will/may) have offered to talk to us about their enthusiams. Be prepared for some surprises!

Wednesday, 17th April

John Gorrett: “The history and Construction of the European Renaissance Lute”
This is a probably a “first” for us. As far as we can remember we have not previously had a speaker who has talked to us about the constructional intricacies of any musical instruments. As you don’t need to be reminded, musical instruments are remarkable for the vital importance of many subtle points in their design, and particularly the precision and artistry of the craftsmanship involved in their construction.... (you only have to ask Antonio Stradivari about this...Oh...hang on, that’s a bit difficult isn’t it, and apparently he was very secretive), but never mind, John has gone to great lengths to investigate such matters in the pursuit of making a Lute (or is it Lutes?) which is represenantive of the best Renaissance examples of that instrument, and we are informed that he is not as secretive as Stradivari was....(not that Stardivari was necessarily any good with Lutes).

Tuesday, 7st May (10am-4pm)

Salisbury M.E.S. Expo 2019
OUR OWN DAY TO GET TOGETHER AND DISPLAY OUR MODEL ENGINEERING PROJECTS AT OUR USUAL MEETING PLACE. Following the great success of this event over the last two years, please bring along your projects, past, present (and future even! “Partly built” stuff is most welcome) and bench-work demonstrations are encouraged, providing they are practical for the hall (no steam hammers to be brought into the hall please). With a large car park, full sized projects of cars and motorcycles etc can also be accommodated. Most importantly, please bring yourselves, whether or not you are bringing any of your work. Our idea is that this is for us and we are not opening it to the general public (if for no other reason than health and safety), but friends are completely welcome. Further information, if required, from Mike Lee on 01980 623238.

Saturday 11th and Sunday 12th May

Society stand at the Countryside Museum working weekend at Breamore House Nr Fordingbridge (subject to us having enough volunteers to man the stand).

Wednesday, 15th May

A volunteer from the Crofton Steam Pumping Station will talk to us about “The History and Functioning of the Crofton Steam Pumping Engines”
A few years ago we had a summer visit to the Crofton puming station which created a lot of interest among the members and friends who attended. The purpose of the Pumping station is to control the water levels in the Kennet and Avon Canal.There are two engines, a Boulton and Watt engine built in 1812, and another engine built in 1846 by the Harvey company of Hayle in Cornwall. The 1812 engine is the world’s oldest working beam engine still in its original setting and capable of carrying out its original work.

Wednesday, 19th June

Douglas Parish: “How I got tangled up in D-Day 75 years ago”
The 6th June 1944 (D-Day) is one of the most important dates of the 20th century. On that day Allied forces invaded mainland Europe to clear that troubled continent of Hitler’s poisonous regime.....It turns out that one of our recently-joined members was part of that momenous day! He is going to give us a first hand account of his experiences on that day (and after) that he spent on one of the ships of the Royal Navy Cruiser squadron that was supporting and protecting our invading land forces.

Saturday, 22nd June

Our Outing this year is to the Bursledon Brickworks museum.
[Please can ALL members RSVP to this to say whether they will, or will-not, be attending this event. Thank you.]
This was a fully mechanised steam driven brickworks and when it was about to be demolished a group of enthusiasts had it listed, and it is now run as a museum. It does have some relevance to our interests as it used to be powered by a steam engine and had a narrow gauge railway to bring the clay from the pits which are now on the other side of the M27.
Attractions:

  • It has some enormous machinery
  • The kilns and drying sheds are intact
  • A massive collection of chimney pots and tiles!
  • The locomotive is still there and run on some steaming days
  • Guided tours
  • Not too far away
And, last but not least a café doing hot meals! Overall, there is plenty to look at but if time allows it would also be possible to visit the working windmill at the top of the hill. Thank you to Peter Scrivens for organising this trip

Tuesday, 9th July

Committee Meeting

Wednesday, 17th July

Our “Picnic” Evening, please encourage your spouses and friends to join us wherever we decide to gather.
This year it will be held at "The White Hart at Bishopstone", 7 o’clock for a 7.30 meal.

The White Hart
Butt Lane,
Bishopstone,
Salisbury.
SP5 4AA

Please send your menu choices to Dave Murray. (Starters & Main Menu, Desert Menu)

Saturday, 20th July (estimated date)

Durrington Festival: Society stand (subject to us having enough volunteers to man the stand).

Wednesday, 21st August

Natter Night.
Bring your bits and pieces along, and we will also have a showing of a video about Lathe work.

Wednesday, 18th September

Dave Tonks: “A Novel Clock based on a Water-Damped Gravity-Driven Inertia-regulated Oscillator”
We generally regard clocks as every-day commonplace items, but the clock that Dave is going to talk about is nothing like that. Of course, you only have to think about the complex and philosophical nature of time to realise that clocks can never be commonplace.

Wednesday, 16th October

Keith Shephard: “The Engineering Triamphs of John Alfred Prestwich (JAP) and his amazing business empire”
Keith visited us in October 2018 and presented a very well received talk on some of the principal engine makers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This time he’s going to talk about somebody who you have probably heard of more through his initials (JAP) than through his full name. The JAP company (1895-1963) was famous for light- weight, powerful and reliable engines used on motor bikes, light aircraft and motor cars. But less well remembered is its dominance of the cinema camera manufacturing Industry from its very early days in the 1890’s through to the 1920’s Keith is an active member of our sister (brother?) model engineering society in Westbury (82D). He works with foundaries in Poland, and here in the UK; so he is well placed to appreciate the work of Mr Prestwich.

Wednesday, 20th November

Mike Orman: “The second half of the Wellworthy and Howlett Piston Ring Company’s story”
Those of you who have heard Mike’s fascinating account of the earlier history of the Wellworthy company will not want to miiss this sequel. There is an aspect of this company that reminds one of “For the sake of a nail the shoe was lost...etc”: Without reliable, ingenious, and efficient piston rings the internal combustion piston engine is nowhere. Wellworthy and Howlett were at the very top of the piston ring game innovating ingenious and relaible piston rings, thereby enabling new development in engine design, from before the first World War until nearly the end of the 20th century. This should further dispel the long-held mystery of exactly what Mike does in his day job; The long-established Welworthy company is a strategic manufacturing company with a fascinating history, closely linked to the highest performance internal combustion engines. Without this company would we have won the Battle of Britain?